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    3 December, 2019
  • Readings | In 2016, I rushed out a short story. This Saturday and Sunday (7 & 8 December), I'll be reading that story at the Artscience Museum. I realised I haven't talked much about "Aviatrix", my first published short story about a time-travelling anthropologist in an anthology. . In part, it's because I'm weirdly shy + later if you read it and not nice THEN HOW?? + I judge self-indulgent writers too. . But indulge me a few moments; here's a few behind-the-scenes sentences about that Story. "Aviatrix" was a short story written for a module called "Sources of Singapore History", a Level-4000 Honours class focusing on just *ONE* year in Singapore history. The idea was to find everything we could about Singapore in that 1 year - and then weave a Story out of the facts everyone found, and brought to class. One of the indirect products of those searches was this short story, started and written ~15 hours before the deadline (the other was my Masters' Thesis, which took slightly longer). I'd sat on the rough idea for a week, but last-minute terror always works its wonders. And so - with the facts we'd found about 1930 Singapore, I weaved together a story about Amy Johnson, the first lady to fly solo from London to Australia. Her 24-hour stopover in Singapore on 18 May 1930 forms the focus of "Aviatrix", because visions of flight, exploration, and discovery, have always enthralled my imagination, along with science fiction, animals, and magic. Tigers. Rivers. The sky, burning gold with glorious morning. So, I asked: what if? What if Amy Johnson was actually a time-traveller, come to find the last tigers of Singapore? What if she was homesick, because the past is a foreign country? What if the Singapore River spoke to her? What if we imagined Singapore with more mystery and wonder? Somehow, astonishingly, the editors at @ethosbooks liked that idea too. And so this Sat & Sun, 4pm-5pm, I'll be reading my story at @artsciencemuseumsg , alongside @beth.rest, Diana Rahim and Marylyn Tan, contributors of the anthology 'In this Desert, there were Seeds' (book pictured, with bamboo). . Come say hi if you're in the area, and dun say bojio, cos I jio already!
    Readings | In 2016, I rushed out a short story.

This Saturday and Sunday (7 & 8 December), I'll be reading that story at the Artscience Museum.

I realised I haven't talked much about "Aviatrix", my first published short story about a time-travelling anthropologist in an anthology.
.
In part, it's because I'm weirdly shy + later if you read it and not nice THEN HOW?? + I judge self-indulgent writers too.
.
But indulge me a few moments; here's a few behind-the-scenes sentences about that Story. "Aviatrix" was a short story written for a module called "Sources of Singapore History", a Level-4000 Honours class focusing on just *ONE* year in Singapore history.  The idea was to find everything we could about Singapore in that 1 year - and then weave a Story out of the facts everyone found, and brought to class.

One of the indirect products of those searches was this short story, started and written ~15 hours before the deadline (the other was my Masters' Thesis, which took slightly longer). I'd sat on the rough idea for a week, but last-minute terror always works its wonders. 
And so - with the facts we'd found  about 1930 Singapore, I weaved together a story about Amy Johnson, the first lady to fly solo from London to Australia.

Her 24-hour stopover in Singapore on 18 May 1930 forms the focus of "Aviatrix", because visions of flight, exploration, and discovery, have always enthralled my imagination, along with science fiction, animals, and magic.

Tigers. Rivers. The sky, burning gold with glorious morning.

So, I asked: what if?

What if Amy Johnson was actually a time-traveller, come to find the last tigers of Singapore? What if she was homesick, because the past is a foreign country? What if the Singapore River spoke to her?

What if we imagined Singapore with more mystery and wonder?

Somehow, astonishingly, the editors at @ethosbooks liked that idea too.

And so this Sat & Sun, 4pm-5pm, I'll be reading my story at @artsciencemuseumsg , alongside @beth.rest, Diana Rahim and Marylyn Tan, contributors of the anthology 'In this Desert, there were Seeds' (book pictured, with bamboo).
.
Come say hi if you're in the area, and dun say bojio, cos I jio already!

    Readings | In 2016, I rushed out a short story.

    This Saturday and Sunday (7 & 8 December), I'll be reading that story at the Artscience Museum.

    I realised I haven't talked much about "Aviatrix", my first published short story about a time-travelling anthropologist in an anthology.
    .
    In part, it's because I'm weirdly shy + later if you read it and not nice THEN HOW?? + I judge self-indulgent writers too.
    .
    But indulge me a few moments; here's a few behind-the-scenes sentences about that Story. "Aviatrix" was a short story written for a module called "Sources of Singapore History", a Level-4000 Honours class focusing on just *ONE* year in Singapore history. The idea was to find everything we could about Singapore in that 1 year - and then weave a Story out of the facts everyone found, and brought to class.

    One of the indirect products of those searches was this short story, started and written ~15 hours before the deadline (the other was my Masters' Thesis, which took slightly longer). I'd sat on the rough idea for a week, but last-minute terror always works its wonders.
    And so - with the facts we'd found about 1930 Singapore, I weaved together a story about Amy Johnson, the first lady to fly solo from London to Australia.

    Her 24-hour stopover in Singapore on 18 May 1930 forms the focus of "Aviatrix", because visions of flight, exploration, and discovery, have always enthralled my imagination, along with science fiction, animals, and magic.

    Tigers. Rivers. The sky, burning gold with glorious morning.

    So, I asked: what if?

    What if Amy Johnson was actually a time-traveller, come to find the last tigers of Singapore? What if she was homesick, because the past is a foreign country? What if the Singapore River spoke to her?

    What if we imagined Singapore with more mystery and wonder?

    Somehow, astonishingly, the editors at @ethosbooks liked that idea too.

    And so this Sat & Sun, 4pm-5pm, I'll be reading my story at @artsciencemuseumsg , alongside @beth.rest, Diana Rahim and Marylyn Tan, contributors of the anthology 'In this Desert, there were Seeds' (book pictured, with bamboo).
    .
    Come say hi if you're in the area, and dun say bojio, cos I jio already!

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